College Planning & Management

JUN 2013

College Planning & Management is the information resource for professionals serving the college and university market. Covering facilities, security, technology and business.

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GettinG into ColleGe, today in lockdown, every second counts. When it comes to a lockdown situation, speed is essential. AD-Series wireless locks provide real-time wireless security that delivers lockdown throughout your campus in 10 seconds or less. AD-Series locks work with most existing campus card systems and are available with multi-technology readers that are NFC compatible and adaptable. This allows you to conform to emerging technologies. So if you have a second, give us a call at 888-641-3260 or visit schlage.com/rightcall. simple. smart. connected. 36 The High Cost Of Conventional Access Control When a credentialed user presents a card to a reader at a door controlled by a conventional card access control system, the reader sends the card's credentials to an intelligent panel, which stores credentials with permission to enter this door. If the card's credentials are valid, the panel signals the door's magnetic lock to open. If not, the door remains locked. Either way, the panel sends a record of the event to a database of transactions that a manager can audit. Intelligent panels can handle up to 32 doors in reasonably close proximity. If a building has 33 doors, it needs two panels. Costs include buying the panels, installing them, and cabling them to all controlled doors and back to the head-end. Panels are a signifcant access control cost. PoE and WiFi technology eliminate intelligent panels and their associated costs. PoE At The University Of Pittsburgh The University of Pittsburgh (Pitt) has used electronic access control across campus for more than a decade, says Joshua Cochran, director of the campus Integrated Security Department. "We're an urban campus, intertwined with city communities, and we have no true perimeter," continues Cochran. "We've had an active shooter incident. We've had bomb threats. We've had protestors walking through the campus, and we don't want them pouring into a building. For all of these reasons, we need access control technology, sometimes with police presence." Pitt's main campus is comprised of about 80 buildings with more than 5,000 access control readers, says Cochran. Controlled buildings include residence halls, academic buildings, administrative buildings, and offce buildings. Students, faculty, and staff card into each building. "The University is currently retroftting 1,100 doors with SARGENT Passport 1000 COLLEGE PLANNING & MANAGEMENT / JUNE 2013 Provisioning access cards to open residence doors and other doors around campus and to access meal plans and debit accounts for vending and laundry is a timeconsuming task. Today's advanced access control systems automate all of that. P1 PoE locks in addition to the approximately 500 P1 locks they already have," notes Faenza. SARGENT Manufacturing Company is an ASSA ABLOY Group company. "We'll add another 1,200 PoE locks this summer and plan to add 1,000 per year for a couple of years," Cochran says. "PoE locks are intelligent devices," adds Faenza. "When someone presents a card to the reader embedded in the PoE lock (mounted on the door), the access decision is made right there. "An event at the door and changes to the system — such as the addition of newly authorized names to the database — causes the lock to communicate with the head-end system, upload its events, and receive the updated access rights. It also communicates alarms immediately." Cochran wanted a hard-wired or live system, and he opted for the SARGEANT PoE solution because it combines power and data in a single cable while eliminating the access control panel and associated cabling requirements, and enabling a faster, easier installation, continues Faenza. Another feature that Cochran points to is power savings. "PoE is green," he says. "It uses 10 percent of the power used by a standard direct current system," he says. "If a regular lockset draws 400 watts, PoE will draw just 40 watts." www.PLANNING 4EduCATION.COM

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